Wednesday, April 1, 2015

Lace Up and Move. It’s National Walking Day!


The American Heart Association wants people to lace up and get moving in celebration of National Walking DayApril 1st!

These days, we’re spending more time at work and sitting in front of a screen than ever before. We're becoming less active, which can increase our risk of heart disease, stroke and other diseases.

Simply walking has many health benefits. Research has shown that every hour of regular exercise can add about two hours to life expectancy, even if you don’t start until midlife. Plus, physical activity can relieve depression, improve your memory, lower your blood pressure and help prevent obesity.
On the other hand, being inactive is a risk factor for heart disease and stroke, which are the nation’s leading cause of death and a leading cause of disability. They account for about one of every three deaths each year and more than $300 billion a year in health-related costs including lost productivity.
Adults should get at least 150 minutes of physical activity a week, and kids should get 60 minutes of physical activity every day. But 80 percent of Americans don’t make exercise a regular habit, according to a recent American Heart Association survey. Statistics show that people tend to stick with walking more than other forms of exercise. That’s why the association promotes walking as one of the simplest and most effective ways for everyone to get moving. 
The American Heart Association provides a wealth of walking, physical activity and healthy living information online and sponsors local programs and events like the Heart Walk.

How will you get moving on National Walking Day? Use the hashtag #AHALaceUp and let us know!

Tuesday, March 24, 2015

American Heart Volunteers Urge State Ed to Make CPR Part of Curriculum

April 19th marks 180 days since the CPR in Schools law went to the state Department of Education from Governor Andrew Cuomo. The New York State Ed must make a recommendation to the Board of Regents to include Hands-Only CPR instruction in the curriculum by the April 19th deadline.
Kevin Foord's life was saved by his daughter's CPR


 Kevin Foord of Suffern knows the importance of time – when he suffered sudden cardiac arrest in 2002, it was his daughter’s immediate action that saved his life. She started CPR on her father – because of that, he was able to walk her down the aisle.

Foord is one of many American Heart Association volunteers reaching out directly to Acting Commissioner of the state Department of Education Elizabeth Berlin, and to the Board of Regents to tell them that we need all high school students to learn Hands-Only CPR.

“I wouldn’t be here today if my daughter hadn’t learned CPR as a teenager.  I wouldn’t have even been able to walk her down the aisle.  We have been advocating for CPR in Schools for years,” Foord said, “We are closer than ever, and I urge everyone to contact Acting Commissioner Berlin and Chancellor of the Board of Regents Merryl Tisch to tell them how important it is that all high school students learn Hands-Only CPR.”

Kevin Foord lobbied for CPR in Schools in Albany
“CPR is easy to teach and easy to learn.  That’s why so many other states require students to learn this lifesaving skill.  It takes just one class period.  Surely, New York can do the same,” said Bob Elling, chair of the American Heart Association’s New York State Advocacy Committee. “Sadly, about 9 out of 10 victims of sudden cardiac arrest die.  We can change this grim statistic by teaching Hands-Only CPR to students.  The cost is negligible, since a YouTube video gives an overview, and a few manikins let students practice the skill.”

New York would be the 22nd state to include the Hands-Only CPR training to the curriculum. To learn more about CPR in Schools, visit www.becprsmart.org.


Saturday, March 21, 2015

Hundreds Walk for Heart Health in Kingston


Despite a light snowfall on the first day of spring yesterday, hundreds of Hudson Valley residents came out to walk at the American Heart Association’s (AHA) Heart Walk event Dietz Stadium today, Saturday, March 21st to help their own hearts and raise funds for the AHA’s heart programs and research which will help even more hearts.

“Heart disease and stroke are the number one and five killers in the Hudson Valley. Walking can be the magic pill when it comes to improving health. We hope that local residents will join this exciting and inspiring event to support the important work of the American Heart Association,” said Daniel J. O’Dea, MD, FACC, Chief of Cardiology, Vassar Brothers Medical Center.

The Heart Walk is part of the AHA’s My Heart. My Life. initiative to improve the heart health of Americans. The AHA’s recommends physical activity, like walking, for 30 minutes on most days of the week to strengthen your heart, improve your health and prevent the leading killers—heart disease and stroke.

Last year’s event raised more than $409,000 for the AHA. It is one of the region’s largest one-day fund raisers and one of the only winter walk events. Events like the Heart Walk fund the AHA’s critical research and awareness programs that help save lives from cardiovascular diseases like heart disease and stroke – the number one and five killers in the U.S. The American Heart Association currently funds four Hudson Valley researchers with grants totaling $1.12 million.

The event featured a heart healthy 2- or 4-mile walk, heart health education, refreshments, entertainment and children’s activities. Free CPR instruction was offered by Regional Hands-Only CPR Sponsor, MidHudson Regional Hospital of Westchester Medical Center.

If you couldn't make it to the Heart Walk but want to support the AHA, you can make a donation online at www.dutchessulsterheartwalk.org or by callig 845-905-2120.


The Heart Walk is sponsored nationally by Subway, and locally by Health Quest, the Heart Center, MidHudson Regional Hospital of Westchester Medical Center, Laerdal Medical, Adams Fairacre Farms, Townsquare Media, Southern Dutchess News and Hudson Valley Magazine.

Friday, March 13, 2015

The Dutchess Heart Walk is ON for Tomorrow at Vassar College!


Are you ready to walk at tomorrow's Heart Walk, Hudson Valley? 

You can still register online at www.dutchessulsterheartwalk.org 

Rain is in the forecast! Please dress appropriately!
Tomorrow's Heart Walk is ON, rain, snow, sleet or sunshine! Please dress appropriately for the weather!

Due to muddy conditions, the path by the lake will not be available, so please stay on the marked paths. You are welcome to walk inside the gym where team photos are taken, if weather is inclement.

We're looking forward to seeing all of you tomorrow morning, Saturday, March 14th at Vassar College to walk for your own hearts and raise funds for the AHA’s heart programs and research, which will help even more hearts. 

Registration opens at 8:30 AM and the walk starts at 10:00 AM!

The Heart Walk is part of the AHA’s My Heart. My Life. initiative to improve the heart health of Americans. The AHA’s recommends physical activity, like walking, for 30 minutes on most days of the week to strengthen your heart, improve your health and prevent the leading killers—heart disease and stroke.

Can't make it to the Heart Walk? You can still make donations online.
www.dutchessulsterheartwalk.org Or call 845-905-2120 for more information.

This path will be closed due to muddy conditions!
The Heart Walk is sponsored nationally by Subway, and locally by Health Quest, the Heart Center, MidHudson Regional Hospital of Westchester Medical Center, Laerdal Medical, Adams Fairacre Farms, Townsquare Media, Southern Dutchess News and Hudson Valley Magazine.

Friday, March 6, 2015

Heart Walk Coming March 14th at Vassar College


Hudson Valley residents are invited to join the American Heart Association’s (AHA) Heart Walk event at Vassar College on Saturday, March 14th to help their own hearts and raise funds for the AHA’s heart programs and research which will help even more hearts.

Register online at www.dutchessulsterheartwalk.org 

“Heart disease and stroke are the number one and five killers in the Hudson Valley. Walking can be the magic pill when it comes to improving health. We hope that local residents will join this exciting and inspiring event to support the important work of the American Heart Association,” said Daniel J. O’Dea, MD, FACC, Chief of Cardiology, Vassar Brothers Medical Center, event Chair.

The Heart Walk is part of the AHA’s My Heart. My Life. initiative to improve the heart health of Americans. The AHA’s recommends physical activity, like walking, for 30 minutes on most days of the week to strengthen your heart, improve your health and prevent the leading killers—heart disease and stroke.

Poughkeepsie residents Dave Binger of Poughkeepsie, and Tammy Brennan or Stormville have been serving as Inspirational Honorees for the event. The story of Seth Erlebacher, the memorial honoree, has been shared by his wife Melissa, Pleasant Valley, to raise awareness for heart attack symptoms and early prevention. Their efforts will be celebrated at the event.

Add caption
Last year’s event raised more than $409,000 for the AHA. It is one of the region’s largest one-day fund raisers and one of the only winter walk events. Events like the Heart Walk fund the AHA’s critical research and awareness programs that help save lives from cardiovascular diseases like heart disease and stroke – the number one and four killers in the U.S. The American Heart Association currently funds four Hudson Valley researchers with grants totaling $1.12 million.

The event features a heart healthy 2- or 4-mile walk, heart health education, refreshments and entertainment. There will be children’s activities and free CPR demonstrations by Regional Hands-Only CPR Sponsor, MidHudson Regional Hospital of Westchester Medical Center. 

There is another Ulster County event at Kingston’s Dietz Stadium on March 21th. Registration for both events is online at www.dutchessulsterheartwalk.org . Donations can also be made online. Call 845-905-2120 for more information.

The Heart Walk is sponsored nationally by Subway, and locally by Health Quest, the Heart Center, MidHudson Regional Hospital of Westchester Medical Center, Laerdal Medical, Adams Fairacre Farms, Townsquare Media, Southern Dutchess News and Hudson Valley Magazine.







Wednesday, February 11, 2015

Tackle Heart Health Together - 14 Healthier Valentine's Day Ideas



Your sweetheart may have the key to your heart, but a proper diet and regular physical activity can be the key to a healthy heart. This Valentine’s Day, skip the chocolates and indulge your sweetheart with a heart-healthy gift or date. There’s no better gift than helping each other maintain healthy habits to prevent heart disease and stroke, the No.1 and No. 5 health threats, so you can live a longer, stronger life together.

Christa and Patrick Page would agree that couples who sweat together can stay healthy together for many years to come. The married couple workout together at Gold’s Gym in LaGrange, NY.

“We definitely push each other to do more. When you’re working out with a companion, you’re more likely to go because they’re depending on you. You don’t back out of it or make excuses not to go,” said Christa Page.

They take yoga and kickboxing classes together, workout with a trainer and enjoy outdoor sports together like snowboarding, paddle boarding and mountain biking.

“We just really enjoy each other’s company and push each other to be healthy,” she said, “We feel more energized, more connected.”

“With yoga, it’s a great, intense workout but it’s good to relax for an hour and de-stress together,” said Patrick Page.

The American Heart Association recommends exercising 30 minutes most days of the week to prevent heart disease and stroke, the number one and five killers. Working out together as a couple is a great way to improve health during American Heart Month and year-round. Here are 14 other ways to make your February 14th a sweet, and healthy Valentine’s Day from the American Heart Association | American Stroke Association.

  1. Quality time is one of the most meaningful gifts. Bundle up and plan an active mid-winter outing such as sledding, ice skating, or skiing.
  2. Build a cozy fire – chopping and collecting wood counts as exercise!
  3. Try a new physical activity together like an indoor rock climbing or indoor golf lessons.
  4. Make reservations at your favorite healthy restaurant – sample a variety of heart healthy menu items and share a dessert to help control calories.
  5. Create a gourmet dinner at home with healthy seasonal foods like sweet potatoes, Brussels sprouts, apples, pears, carrots and winter squash. Try cooking methods like baking, roasting and steaming and use lean meats and whole grains.
  6. Add spice of life but not the sodium – Eat well and healthy meals together but pledge to reduce sodium in your meals to help prevent high blood pressure and stroke.
  7. Roast chestnuts by an open fire.  Yes, go nuts by the fire! Roasted, unsalted nuts of all varieties are great as appetizers and gifts. You can also add nuts to many winter dishes, such as green beans with dry-roasted almonds.
  8. Toast to heart health with non-alcohol drinks.  Be mindful of your health and drink in moderation. Enjoy non-alcoholic versions of your favorite cocktails to lower calories or use less alcohol by mixing with sparkling water or sugar-free juices.
  9. Hit the dance floor – What’s more romantic than taking your sweetheart out for a spin on the dance floor? Even if it’s dancing around the living room, dancing is a great aerobic activity that can burn over 300 calories per hour.
  10. Walk and talk – Set up regular morning or evening walks together to get your 30 minutes of exercise in while connecting with each other.
  11. Meditate and destress together – Keeping stress out of a marriage isn’t easy, but building in time to meditate together can help and keep you focused on the important things in life.
  12. Roll out your yoga mat side-by-side – Buy a new beginner’s Yoga DVD and try Yoga together to distress, stretch and strengthen.
  13. Snuggle up for a nap - We’re not talking hibernation, even though staying under the covers all day may sound attractive. Stay healthy all winter long by getting enough sleep (about eight hours a night). Sleep helps to ward off illness, maintain weight and keep your heart healthy.
  14. Workout together – Don’t hit the gym alone. Couples can support and motivate each other, and help each other stay committed to achieve fitness goals.

 For more information on staying healthy, visit www.heart.org.


Tuesday, February 10, 2015

Kids, Get Fit During American Heart Month with 4-Week FitKids Challenge!


The best way to stay healthy is to develop good habits and that begins at an early age. Time Warner Cable News is devoting the month of February to show kids and adults great ways to stay fit with healthy recipes, activities for the whole family and informative pieces to help you and your kids feel good inside and out.

Take the Fit Kids Challenge! 
The 4-week challenge, designed with help from the American Heart Association, encourages you and your family to make simple and healthy choices.

Motivate your friends and family
Encourage others by sharing photos of health and fitness on social media using hashtag: #FitKidsFeb 

video

Learn more at http://www.twcnews.com/fitkids.html